Rodney Rock

Rodney Rock

My name is Rodney Rock, (yes, that is my real name, not my stage name). I grew up in Ohio, watching my Dad as a kid, as he snapped photos with his Polaroid – something that absolutely amazed me. I joined the Army in 1977 and with my first paycheck I bought a Kodak 110 camera. It went everywhere with me, including overseas .Years later I was given a SLR that really gave me the shooting bug.One of my first shoots with the new Konica was at Kingwood Center, a mansion with incredible gardens in Mansfield, Ohio. There, one spring day, I met a photographer that gave me a lot of insight and it has stuck with me all these years later. In 1999 I saw the first digital camera and had to have one – I’ve not looked back since. I took night photography classes in South Florida over a course of 4 years and won the first photography show I entered, placing 1st, 3rd and honorable mention. I have been on numerous Scott Kelby photo walks,(Scott is one of the top Photoshop gurus), not only in Florida, but in North Carolina,as well. I won the award for best shot for the NC Zoo walk in 2011, being one of approximately 40 participants. As a short time member of Falling Rivers Gallery I have entered two shows, placing second place and Best of Show in the Nature At Its Best show, and first and third in the Summer Art Explosion show. I have traveled all over the US, visiting 39 states, finding beauty in each one. My favorite place so far was shooting in Yellowstone for two weeks - that was a total blast! While living in Florida I spent most of my time shooting in the Everglades and at the many beaches, capturing sunrise after sunrise. I was fortunate enough to be part of a group of avid photographers from the class I took that would get together to shoot all over, it did not matter if it was at 2:00 am for night shots in the Glades, South Beach, downtown,every idea was worth exploring. In North Carolina you will find me on the backroads shooting old cars, barns, or whatever else that catches my eye. My mantra is “Preserving Southern History One Photo at a time”.